Difference between GR64 and Gx47 latest

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GR64 Integrators Guide Differences Between GR64 & GR4x Devices

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Ericsson Mobile Communications International. The contents are confidential and any

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First Edition, April 2006

Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications International publishes this manual without

making any warranty as to the content contained herein. Further Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications International reserves the right to make modifications, additions and deletions to this manual due to typographical errors, inaccurate information, or improvements to programs and/or equipment at any time and without notice. Such changes will, nevertheless be incorporated into new editions of this manual.

All rights reserved. ? Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications International, 2006 Printed in US

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CONTENTS 1 Target Users ....................................................................................... 5

1.1 MIGRATION AIM .......................................................................................................5 1.2 MIGRATION STRATEGY .............................................................................................5 1.3 MIGRATION VALUE ...................................................................................................5

2

Product Differences ............................................................................ 6
INTEGRATED SIM VARIANT ............................................................................6 LEGACY VARIANT ..........................................................................................6

2.1 GR64 VARIANTS .......................................................................................................6 2.1.1 2.1.2

2.2 NOTEWORTHY DIFFERENCES.....................................................................................7 2.2.1 2.2.2 2.2.3 2.2.4 2.2.5 2.2.6 2.2.7 2.2.8 2.2.9 2.2.10 GSM FREQUENCY COVERAGE .........................................................................7 UARTS...........................................................................................................9 GPRS OPERATING CLASS ................................................................................7 USB ...............................................................................................................9 DIGITAL IO ....................................................................................................9 PCM AUDIO .................................................................................................10 SIM INTERFACE............................................................................................13 DAC INTERFACE ..........................................................................................13

ADC INTERFACE ..........................................................................................13

MECHANICAL FORM FACTOR .......................................................................13

2.3 GENERAL OBSERVATIONS .......................................................................................14

3

Product Comparison ......................................................................... 15

3.4 GR64 SIGNAL INTERFACE........................................................................................16 3.5 SPECIFIC SIGNAL DIFFERENCES ...............................................................................18 3.5.1 3.5.2 3.5.3 3.5.4 3.5.5 3.5.6 3.5.7 3.5.8 3.5.9 CHARGING INPUT ........................................................................................21

SIGNAL FUNCTIONALITY ..............................................................................18 SIM VOLTAGE ..............................................................................................21

D TO A CONVERTER ....................................................................................21 A TO D CONVERTER ....................................................................................22 FORMER UART2 ...........................................................................................23

REAL TIME CLOCK VOLTAGE ........................................................................22 REGULATED VOLTAGE REFERENCE ...............................................................22 FORMER PCM AUDIO DIGITAL CODEC INTERFACE.........................................23

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3.5.10 3.5.11

ALARM ........................................................................................................24

SERVICE SIGNAL ..........................................................................................24

3.6 GENERAL SIGNAL DIFFERENCES...............................................................................25 3.6.1 3.6.2 AUDIO INTERFACES .....................................................................................25 MULTIPLEXED SIGNAL FUNCTIONS ...............................................................26

3.7 SOFTWARE COMPATIBILITY.....................................................................................27 3.7.1 3.7.2

SIGNAL BEHAVIOUR .....................................................................................27 AT COMMANDS ...........................................................................................27

4

Mechanical Comparisons .................................................................. 31

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1

Target Users
The GR64 wireless modems are designed to be integrated into machine-tomachine or man-to-machine communications applications.

They are intended to be used by manufacturers, system integrators, applications developers and developers of wireless communications equipment.

The GR64 is design to be functionally comparable to an earlier series of M2M telemetry products; the GM4x series and the GR4x series. These users are the primary focus of the GR64.

1.1

Migration Aim
This document identifies a suitable migration to the GR64 for existing users of the following Sony Ericsson M2M devices: ? ? GM47 GM48 ? ? GR47 GR48

1.2

Migration Strategy
The Sony Ericsson Gx64 series devices provide a family of products based on a Quad Band GPRS Core concept. The GR64 shares a large degree of commonality with the GS64, with the exception that its mechanical form-factor, physical interface, and signal characteristics are designed to be closely aligned to the existing products listed above, thereby providing a convenient path for upgrade.

Some differences do exist between the existing GM/GR4x products and the new GR64. minimize any effects on existing users.

This Migration Guide highlights the differences and identifies ways to

1.3

Migration Value
The GR64 was developed for a number key reasons, all of them designed to benefit existing users of the predecessor family: ? Newer technology ? ROHS compliance ? Better performance

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2

Product Differences
This section identifies the major differences between GR64 and the predecessor GR47/48 products. For all practical purposes the comparisons also reflect the

similarities and differences to the GM47/48 since these products are merely a subset function of the GR products.

2.1

GR64 Variants
The GR64 is available in a number of variants. The major variance is described below, and a table is included as a quick-guide reference.

2.1.1

Integrated SIM variant
The integrated SIM variant GR64 has, as the name suggests, a physical SIM holder card connected through the system connector (off-board). mounted on the top side of the assembly. Like its predecessor it supports a SIM

GR64 also has a USB interface and a Real Time Clock (RTC) alarm output. Digital PCM connectivity is different to that of legacy products. Level shifting circuitry is incorporated in the module, allowing the host to provide its own I/O reference.

This version of the

Additionally, the integrated SIM variant is available with or without Embedded Applications capability.

2.1.2

Legacy variant
The legacy variant GR64 relies on an off-board SIM connection, accessible through the system connector. The legacy variant does not support USB or the RTC alarm, but does allow legacy applications to retain digital PCM audio routing without making changes to their application PCB. Level shifting circuitry is incorporated in the module providing instant compatibility with 2.8V/3.0V legacy technology, or allowing the host to use a module-originated I/O reference to level shift its application I/O.

Additionally, the integrated SIM variant is available with or without Embedded Applications capability.

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GR64 Variants Quick Guide GR64 Product Integrated SIM holder USB interface RTC Alarm interface Direct 2.8V/3.0V I/O compatible On board level shifting support Embedded Application support DPY 101 1494/10 NO NO NO YES YES NO DPY 101 1494/20 YES YES YES NO YES NO DPY 101 1494/30 NO NO NO YES YES YES DPY 101 1494/40 YES YES YES NO YES YES

2.2

Noteworthy Differences
Some essential differences exist between the respective products, which are summarized here and described in further detail in subsequent sections of this document.

2.2.1

GSM Frequency Coverage
The GR64 is a Quad Band product, unlike its predecessors which were dual band. The GR64 provides seamless GSM coverage in all regions of the world, in the following GSM bands: ? GSM 850 ? E-GSM 900 ? GSM 1800 ? GSM 1900

2.2.2

GPRS Operating Class
The GR64 is a GPRS Class 10 capable device, compared with its predecessors which were Class 8. downlink slots that are permissible, as the following tables show: GPRS Class marking defines the number of uplink and

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GPRS Multislot Class Support Multislot Class 8 10 12 Downlink Slots 4 4 4 Uplink Slots 1 2 4 Active Slots 5 5 5 Yes No No Product Capability GR47 GR48 Yes No No GR64 Yes Yes Planned

Multislot Class Performance – all configurations Multislot Class 8 10 Downlink Slots 4 4 3 4 12 3 2 1 Uplink Slots 1 1 2 1 2 3 4 Maximum Data Rate Receive 32-40Kbps 32-48Kbps 24-36Kbps 32-48Kbps 24-36Kbps 16-24Kbps 8-12Kbps Send 8-12Kbps 8-12Kbps 16-24Kbps 8-12Kbps 16-24Kbps 24-36Kbps 32-48Kbps

Actual data rates achieved are dependent upon the Coding Scheme (CS) in use; the table above shows the range of rates that are achievable within the CS classes supported by the GR64.

The major impact of GPRS Class differences between the GR64 and legacy

products is the demand upon power supplies to maintain peak currents during the increased number of transmission bursts within a single GSM timeslot. The major impact is in the lower GSM bands (GSM850/900) where maximum transmitter

output power is 2W (33dBm). In order to support more than two bursts within a GSM timeframe it may be necessary for integrators to review their power supply designs in order to make full use of the added uplink slot capability of GR64.

To overcome the problem that multiple uplink allocation may present to legacy applications, two measures have been taken:

Firstly, users have the capability to modify the GPRS operating class reported to being allocated additional uplink slots;

the network in the initial release of products, thereby avoiding the potential for

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Secondly, production units will have a dynamic power control function which consumption increase is negligible compared with the single uplink case.

reduces the maximum power that is generated such that average current

2.2.3

UARTs
The GR64 has only two UART interfaces, unlike its predecessors which had three. UART1 and UART3 still exist. For legacy reasons the signal nomenclature has been retained, so that the original

UART2 has been replaced by a USB peripheral interface for the integrated SIM variant.

2.2.4

USB
that it can be connected to a controller (host) USB device for command and control operations, providing the obvious advantage of increased speed compared with its UART predecessor. The integrated SIM variant GR64 has a USB endpoint (slave) interface, which means

2.2.5

Digital IO
The GM/GR4x series operated 2.78V digital IO. GR64 utilizes 1.8V logic. The newer technology of the To overcome interface difficulties with legacy

applications, the GR64 has level shifters on each of the IO interfaces.

The legacy variant GR64 references an internal 2.8V regulator, performing the necessary bi-directional level translation. interface circuitry may be necessary due to the internal impedance of the level shifters themselves; this is detailed in a subsequent section. Some modification to existing user

The integrated SIM variant GR64 employs the same level shifters, and provides a VREF input signal so that users can provide an application-side digital IO reference voltage to the GR64 module.

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2.2.6

PCM Audio
The GM/GR4x series implemented a PCM (digital) audio feature which permitted the user to access the interface between the audio Codec and the DSP, which also allowed additional DSP devices to be wired at this junction.

The GR64 baseband architecture does not lend itself to the same physical to a parallel data bus. However, the echo cancellation capability of GR64 is a vast challenges.

interface as the predecessor hardware, since the digital audio is memory mapped improvement on the predecessor series, and simply does not present the same

The legacy variant GR64 will allow legacy application PCBs, wired so that the

respective PCM uplink and downlink paths are connected, to remain unchanged.

However, any external circuitry connected to these pins will not function. Instead, the loss of such circuitry. A PCM audio interface is still available in a standard 4-pin implementation for the integrated SIM variant GR64, using a Texas Instruments SSI implementation.

the advanced echo and noise canceling properties of the GR64 will compensate for

Fig A: GR4x implementation showing the PCM UL & DL paths wired together

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Fig B: GR4x implementation showing the PCM interfacing with an external DSP

Fig C: GR64 integrated SIM variant showing new signal allocation

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Fig D: GR64 Legacy variant showing removal of incompatible signal connectivity

Figures A through D illustrate the differences between signal implementation of the GR64 and predecessor products. Users with application circuits that physically the GR64 legacy variant without risking damage to the host circuitry or the module. In the legacy GR64 variant the links between pins 49 and 50 and their respective onboard circuits are disconnected by means of no-mounted jumpers on the module itself. connect the PCM signal between the CODEC and DSP of the GR4x series may use

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2.2.7

SIM Interface
The GR64 has support for 1.8V and 3.0V SIM cards, unlike the predecessor series which supported 3.0V and 5.0V SIMs.

The integrated SIM variant GR64 also has the capability to support more than one

SIM. For this GR64 variant a secondary interface is available through the systems connector. SIM detection in each holder signals the presence of SIM cards to the GR64 which is able to selectively switch between SIMs.

2.2.8

DAC Interface
A hardware D to A converter was available to users in the GM/GR4x products. The available which can be used to create a DAC-like function on the host application. GR64 does not possess a hardware DAC, instead a programmable PWM signal is

2.2.9

ADC Interface
The A to D converter in the GR64 has a higher resolution (10-bit) compared with its predecessor device (8-bit), and a different input range.

2.2.10 Mechanical Form Factor
The GR64 modem circuitry is significantly different to the predecessor device, being far more highly integrated. fabricated on one side of the board. This single-sided arrangement results in a greatly reduced thickness and the ability to retain one side of the board unpopulated, except for the RF connector. The result is that the wireless modem is

The GR64 mechanical outline remains the same as it’s predecessor devices. The system connector placement, RF connector positioning, and mounting hole locations are identical. The reduced thickness of the PCB (6-layer compared with the approximately 0.2mm lower. 10-layer predecessor) means It is estimated that this will have no impact on that the RF connector centre-line is

existing applications, even those with integrated mechanical housing.

Mechanically, therefore, the GR64 is a true drop-in replacement for the GM/GR4x products. document. Comparative assemblies are shown in a subsequent section of this

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2.3

General Observations
The fundamental difference in hardware and platform architecture between the GM/GR4x and the GR64 means that there are bound to be some incompatibilities. These have been minimized through deliberate and thoughtful replication of the legacy interfaces. Whilst every measure has been taken to create a functionally applications to achieve a drop-in replacement. achievable, such as component value changes. It has been the aim of Sony comparable product in GR64, there will be the inevitable fine tuning adjustment of Ericsson to limit any changes to minor ones which are easily and quickly

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3

Product Comparison
This section compares the GR64 with its predecessor GR47/48 products, since these are the product that the GR64 was intended to most closely replicate. For

all practical purposes the comparisons also reflect the similarities and differences to the GM47/48 since these products are merely a subset function of the GR products.

mechanical perspective. A signal interface table identifies the proposed pin out signals which are different in the GR64 implementation, and also provides generalized information.

Comparison is made from an electrical signal, functional behavior, software and

and signal assignment. A subsequent chapter reveals specific features of those

Mechanical drawings help the integrator to recognize differences in the basic profile of the products, the GR64’s variant configurations, and inspect the mechanical mounting arrangement to confirm drop-in compatibility.

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3.4

GR64 Signal Interface

Pin 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33

Name VCC GND VCC GND VCC GND VCC GND VCC GND CHG_IN GND ADIN4 GPIO5 ON/OFF SIMVCC SIMDET SIMRST SIMDAT SIMCLK DAC GPIO1 GPIO2 GPIO3 GPIO4 VRTC ADIN1 ADIN2 ADIN3 SDA SCL BUZZER DSR1 GPIO7 LED

Direction Input Input Input Input Input Input Input In/Out Input Output Input Output In/Out Output Output In/Out In/Out In/Out In/Out Input Input Input Input In/Out Output Output Output In/Out Output

Function DC power Ground DC power Ground DC power Ground DC power Ground DC power Ground Battery charger power Ground ADC Input 4 General purpose IO Device on/off control 1.8V or 3.0V SIM card supply SIM presence detection SIM card reset signal SIM card data SIM card clock signal Pulse width modulated signal General purpose IO General purpose IO General purpose IO General purpose IO DC supply for real time clock ADC Input 1 ADC Input 2 ADC Input 3 I2C data (2.8V logic) I2C clock signal (2.8V logic) Buzzer Output Data Set Ready (UART1) General purpose IO LED control signal

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Pin 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60

Name GPIO6 VREF TX_ON RI GPIO8 DTR1 GPIO10 DCD1 GPIO11 RTS1 GPIO9 CTS1 GPIO12 DTM1 DFM1 DTM3 DFM3 USBDP USBDN SSPDTM SSPDFM VUSB ALARM SSPFS SSPCLK MICIP MICIN EARP EARN AUXO SERVICE AUXI AREF

Direction In/Out Output Output Output In/Out Input In/Out Output In/Out Input In/Out Output In/Out Input Output Input Output In/Out In/Out Input Output Output Output In/Out In/Out Input Input Output Output Output Input Input -

Function General purpose IO Core voltage reference Transmit indication Ring Indicator General purpose IO Data Terminal Ready (UART1) General purpose IO Data Carrier Detect (UART1) General purpose IO Ready To Send (UART1) General purpose IO Clear To Send (UART1) General purpose IO Data To Module from host (UART1) Data From Module to host (UART1) Data To Module from host (UART3) Data From Module to host (UART3) USB data positive USB data negative Serial PCM data to module from host Serial PCM data from module to host USB DC power RTC alarm Serial PCM frame synchronization Serial PCM clock Microphone input positive Microphone input negative Earpiece output positive Earpiece output negative Auxiliary audio from module to host Flash programming enable signal Auxiliary audio to module from host Analogue reference

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3.5

Specific Signal Differences
The major differences between GR64 and its predecessors were summarized in section draws attention to specific interfaces which differ from its predecessors. section 2. A further examination of the GR64 proposed signal interface in this

This document aims to give legacy users an insight in to the major differences.

The detailed information for each interface, and its functional behaviour, is contained in the relevant Integrators Manual and supplementary Application Notes.

3.5.1

Signal Functionality
Signal functionality and accessibility differs between product variants. The legacy sacrifices some its predecessors capability because of the nature of the newer product platform (ASICs and software). The following table identifies the differences, compared with the predecessor GM/GR 47/48 products, of the two major hardware variants of the GR64. The major effected signals are further described in the succeeded sections. For the fullest information on particular signal characteristics or their behaviour, integrators should refer to the Integrators Manual and supplementary Application Notes. variant GR64 is designed to accommodate existing applications, but in doing so

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Pin 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34

Name VCC GND VCC GND VCC GND VCC GND VCC GND CHG_IN GND ADIN4 GPIO5 ON/OFF SIMVCC SIMDET SIMRST SIMDAT SIMCLK DAC GPIO1 GPIO2 GPIO3 GPIO4 VRTC ADIN1 ADIN2 ADIN3 SDA SCL BUZZER DSR1 GPIO7 LED GPIO6 VREF

GR64 Legacy Variant

GR64 New Variant

No Change

No Change

Higher Vmax, Lower current No Change ADC input range and bit resolution differs 1.8V & 3.0V only No change No change No change No change PWM output Input/Output impedance interfaces Similar in behaviour

Higher Vmax, Lower current No Change ADC input range and bit resolution differs 1.8V & 3.0V only Internally & Externally supported SIMs PWM output Logic levels are applicationspecific Similar in behaviour

differs, due to level shifter

Interface voltage is different ADC input range and bit resolution differs No change No change Similar implementation Input/Output impedance interfaces

Interface voltage is different ADC input range and bit resolution differs No change No change Similar implementation Logic levels are applicationspecific

differs, due to level shifter

No change

Becomes an input

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Pin 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60

Name TX_ON RI GPIO8 DTR1 GPIO10 DCD1 GPIO11 RTS1 GPIO9 CTS1 GPIO12 DTM1 DFM1 DTM3 DFM3 USBDP USBDN SSPDTM SSPDFM VUSB ALARM SSPFS SSPCLK MICIP MICIN EARP EARN AUXO SERVICE AUXI AREF

GR64 Legacy Variant Not available in R1

GR64 New Variant Not available in R1

differs, due to level shifter interfaces

Input/Output impedance

Logic levels are applicationspecific

Not available in this variant New implementation – interfaces to DSP only Not available Not available New implementation – interfaces to DSP only

UART2 in legacy product New implementation – interfaces to DSP only New to GR64 New to GR64 New implementation – interfaces to DSP only

New to GR64 – replaces

Different audio signal levels

Different audio signal levels

Different implementation Different audio signal levels No change

Different implementation Different audio signal levels No change

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3.5.2

Charging Input
Pin 11 GR64 CHG_IN GR4x CHG_IN Functional Difference Input range, current limit, charge behavior The respective charging processes

GR4x provisioned for a 5V, 600mA charging input. The GR64 has provisions for a 6.3V max, 500mA max charging source. employ different mechanisms. For a full description of the CHG_IN, users should GR64 Integrators Manual, available upon request from the Sony Ericsson M2M Customer Support.

refer to a comprehensive description, and circuit implementation proposal in the

Change Impact: This change should have negligible impact on existing integrators.

3.5.3

SIM voltage
Pin 15 GR64 SIMVCC GR4x SIMVCC Functional Difference Support for SIM technology

The GR64 supports only 1.8V and 3.0V SIM cards. It does not provide support for the 5.0V SIM cards, which became obsolete some years ago.

Change Impact: This change will not impact existing integrators.

3.5.4

D to A Converter
Pin 20 GR64 DAC GR4x DAC Functional Difference Software vs Hardware implementation

The signal from the GR64 to the DAC output is a programmable Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) signal. predecessor interface (which produced a true analogue voltage output) it can be

Although this is not a hardware DAC like the

easily adapted with simple analogue filter circuitry to emulate a DAC function. An example can be found in the GR64 Integrators Manual, available upon request from the Sony Ericsson M2M Customer Support.

Change Impact: This will require some programming and a simple circuit implementation on the host application.

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3.5.5

Real Time Clock Voltage
Pin 25 GR64 VRTC GR4x VRTC Functional Difference Voltage range

The GR4x and GR64 Real Time Clock (RTC) can be powered by a backup device when the modules are not powered. When the module is powered the backup component (a battery cell or capacitor) can be re-charged. VRTC is similar for both devices, but the charging voltage and the backup voltage range. The mechanics of

discharge limit is marginally different, with the GR64 being a narrower guaranteed

Change Impact: In most applications, which require backup periods less than a few weeks, this will not present a problem.

3.5.6

A to D Converter
Pin 22 13 26 27 28 GR64 GPIO2 ADIN4 ADIN1 ADIN2 ADIN3 GR4x ADC5* ADC4 ADC1 ADC2 ADC3 Input resolution & range Functional Difference Does not exist in GR64

The GR64 has a 10-bit ADC, compared with its predecessor product which only offered 8-bit resolution. The input voltage range is slightly narrow in the GR64.

Change Impact: Some additional calibration to adjust the A to D conversion scaling is all that will be required.

3.5.7

Regulated Voltage Reference
Pin 34 GR64 VREF GR4x VIO Functional Difference Integrated level shifters now provided

The GR4x series provided VIO as an indication of power-on to the host, and as a current limited supply for external applications, mostly to be used as a reference for level shifters.

The Legacy variant GR64 provides similar functionality, except its use as a levelintegrated level shifters in the modem. The VREF output is 2.8V.

shifter reference voltage is superseded in the most part by the inclusion of

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For the new variant GR64, the VREF pin is configured as an input. which is used by the host-side level shifter interfaces.

arrangement he user provides a reference voltage from their own application,

In this

Change Impact: No impact to existing users for the legacy variant.

3.5.8

Former UART2
Pin 45 46 GR64 USBDP USBDN GR4x TD2 RD2 Functional Difference UART2 replaced by USB interface

One of the three UARTs in the GR4x series has been replaced by a USB slave interface in the GR64. The absence of a third hardware UART and the industrywide adoption of USB encouraged this change.

Change Impact: For users of the third UART in GR4x products, some reconfiguration of serial interfaces may be necessary.

available; for example AT commands can be executed across USB, making it an as an SPI bus offers another viable serial interface.

Different alternatives are

alternative as a control interface; an Embedded Application for configuring GPIO

3.5.9

Former PCM Audio Digital CODEC Interface
Pin 47 GR64 VUSB GR4x PCMULD Functional Difference PCM CODEC interface does not exist

A PCM interface between the GR4x series audio CODEC and the DSP gave users

the option of installing a DSP device to improve audio acoustic performance. The

GR64 voice-band architecture is more advanced and far better performing than its predecessor. This factor, together with the GR64 memory-mapped digital audio removes the need for this former interface.

The former PCMULD pin is utilized as the voltage supply to the internal USB transceiver. This pin accepts the standard regulated 5V from a USB host

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3.5.10 ALARM
Pin 48 GR64 ALARM GR4x PCMDLD Functional Difference PCM CODEC interface does not exist

The former PCMDLD pin is utilized as an RTC alarm output. This feature is new to GR64. It provides a feature for users to be able to set an alarm based on a RTC module to wake a host application even though the module itself is completely powered down. setting. If an RTC backup source is attached to VRTC, this function will allow the

Change Impact: For users who had DSP devices hooked to this interface, the removal of this circuitry will reduce cost in their product. The audio performance of GR64 overcomes the shortcomings of the predecessor products. Removal of the need for a PCM CODEC interface is considered to be an enhancement. The addition of a RTC Alarm is also viewed as an enhancement.

3.5.11 SERVICE signal
Pin 58 GR64 SERVICE GR4x SERVICE Functional Difference Different voltage, different behavior

a flashing (programming) accelerator, where voltages as great as 12V were applied

The traditional role of the Service function in GR4x-generation devices was that of

to the interface. The memory technology used in GR64 does not require a higher excessive voltage is applied. To overcome the risk of damage to the module,

voltage than the standard digital interface level (2.8V) and will suffer damage if over-voltage protection on the service pin has been implemented.

The Service interface for GR64 is implemented as a simple logic input and should Manual.

be exercised in accordance with the signal levels defined in the GR64 Integrators

Change Impact: Changes in the flash memory programming procedure have no

detrimental impact on existing product users. The only impact is that users will process easier.

have to adopt a new procedure, which is designed to make the programming

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3.6 3.6.1

General Signal Differences Audio Interfaces
The behavior of the audio interfaces from an electrical signal perspective is similar in the GR64 to that of the GR4x series devices.

It is anticipated that there will be minimal or no change to existing application circuitry for the analogue audio sections. achieve reasonable audio quality by maintaining the same interface components. Some inevitable fine tuning of audio profiles may be necessary. Certainly, it should be possible to

The GR64 analogue audio input levels are different to the predecessor products, which further improves performance. values. It is

as are the internal link gains, plus the GR64 has dynamic AGC on the downlink performance users may, at their discretion, adjust input gain scaling and output component implementation to assess whether this is necessary. recommended that users test their existing To optimize analogue audio interface

The PCM (digital) audio interface in the GR64 is pin compatible with the predecessor products for a standard 4-wire synchronous serial interface: ? PCM data from module to host ? PCM data from host to module ? PCM Frame Sync ? PCM Clock The GR64 PCM interface will function in the same sampling manner as the GR4x GR64 PCM interface functions in a master only mode.

products, which uses a 16-bit frame size, 13-bit word, sampled at 8ksps. The

The GR64 PCM word format for regular GSM voice communications is LSB justified, unlike the predecessor products which were offset. Some minor adjustment in existing user application may be necessary to perform bit re-alignment to cater for this difference.

Details of the audio electrical interfaces and PCM frame structure can be found in Customer Support.

the GR64 Integrators Manual available upon request from the Sony Ericsson M2M

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3.6.2

Multiplexed Signal Functions
The GR4x series multiplexes a number of signals to provide additional feature support. Many of these multiplexed functions provide optional GPIO where, for example, RS232 handshaking signals are not required in the customers control interface. available in the same manner in GR64. The capability to use GPIO in preference to the control signals is

The other primary multiplexed interface in GR4x is the Keyboard function. This too is available in GR64 but the mapping is different because of architectural keyboard interfaces, offering various keyboard matrix sizes. constraints. An application note details the method of defining digital GPIO as

Developers that presently use the keyboard feature may need to re-map their existing interface pins to keypad columns and rows.

Details of the multiplexed pin functions can be found in the GR64 Integrators Manual available upon request from the Sony Ericsson M2M Customer Support.

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3.7

Software Compatibility
Legacy users will benefit from having a GR64 product which has been developed to maintain the largest extent of functional compatibility possible with existing enhancements. GR/GM4x products, as well as some advanced features and performance

It has been a Sony Ericsson M2M primary goal to make the GR64 similar enough to its predecessor products such that minimal software effort will be required in user’s existing application. order to achieve the same functions and performance when substituted in the

Some change is inevitable because of core architecture difference. These changes,

and the way in which they impact legacy customers, have been minimized by frequent reference to the control, response, and behavior of the products that the GR64 is replacing.

3.7.1

Signal Behaviour
The LED interface (pin 33) power mode and network connection status indication properties may differ to some degree from GR4x. interface will emulate, as close as possible, the existing indication. The programming of this

3.7.2

AT Commands
The AT command set for the GR64 is similar to that of legacy products. Some additions have been made to the overall command set. Changes and

enhancements have been made to some legacy AT commands which may result in slightly modified behavior, or involve a different number or range of associated parameters.

The most commonly used legacy AT commands are provided in the table below, that of the GR64. The table just provides summary information.

which identifies difference that exist between the GR47/48 implementation and encouraged to refer to the GR64 AT command manual for a comprehensive guide to command parameters, usage and examples.

Users are

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AT Command ATD

Function Dial

Differences in GR64 compared with GR47/48 Additional characters added for <dial_string>:

”A B C”
Additional GSM Modifiers:

W, ",", T and P

ATH AT+CSNS AT+CALA AT+CFUN AT+CPIN AT+CSQ AT*E2RESET AT*ECAM AT*E2APR

Hang up Single Numbering Scheme Set Alarm Set Phone Functionality PIN Control Signal Strength Restart Module Call Monitoring Audio Profile Management

Same as GR47/GR48 command Same as GR47/GR48 command (R7 firmware onwards) Same as GR47/GR48 command Addition of reset <rst> parameter and response New values for <pin>, <code>, and <err> Same as GR47/GR48 command Same as GR47/GR48 command Same as GR47/GR48 command <param1>, <param2> changed from: 0,1,2 to: 0,1,2,3 to match audio profile parameter <op>

AT*E2EAMS

Audio Profile Modification

Some legacy <op> parameters are not supported because of the fundamental difference in audio path architecture Same as GR47/GR48 command <cid> values changed from: 1-10 to: 1-20 new =? query responses provided for: <d-comp> data compression; <h-comp> header compression

AT+CBST AT+CGDCONT

Select Bearer Service Type Define PDP Context

AT+CGREG AT*E2IPA

GPRS Network IP Activate

Registration Status

Same as GR47/GR48 command <cid> added as response to AT*E2IPA? Value range of <cid> changed from: 0-10 to: 0-19 for a reference to a PDP context identifier previously defined with AT+CGDCONT

AT*E2IPC

IP Socket Close

<SockId> optional parameter added

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AT Command AT*E2IPO AT*E2IPI AT*E2IPE

Function IP Open/Connect IP Info IP Error

Differences in GR64 compared with GR47/48 <SockId> optional parameter added Same as GR47/GR48 command <SockId> added as parameter [= Error] response removed Intermediate result codes added for: <ErrNum> 0-18

AT*E2IPL AT*E2IPRH AT*E2IPS AT*ENAD AT+CGMR

IP listen (server) IP Resolve Host IP Setup IP Parameters Internet Account Define Read Revision Identification

Same as GR47/GR48 command Same as GR47/GR48 command Same as GR47/GR48 command Same as GR47/GR48 command <Revision> parameter changed from: a string containing date (year, month, day, hour, minute) plus KRC number to: a string containing the SW product number

(CXC number) and software revision

ATI

Identification Information

Following <value> options deleted: 5 - Active settings 7 - Modem configuration profile 9 - PnP information

AT*E2EMM AT*E2SSN AT+COPS AT*E2SMSRI AT+CMGF AT+CMGS AT+CMGD AT+CMGL AT+CMGR AT+CNMI

Engineering Monitoring Mode SIM Serial Number Operator Selection Ring indicator for SMS Message Format Send Message Delete Message List Message Read Message New Message Indications

Same as GR47/GR48 command Same as GR47/GR48 command Same as GR47/GR48 command Same as GR47/GR48 command Same as GR47/GR48 command Same as GR47/GR48 command Same as GR47/GR48 command Same as GR47/GR48 command Same as GR47/GR48 command <bfr> added as a new parameter as follows: Buffered unsolicited reports defined within this command are cleared when <mode> 1...2 is entered. <mode> value changed from: value 3 to: values 0,1,2

AT+CPMS

Preferred Message Storage

Same as GR47/GR48 command

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AT Command AT+CSCS AT+CSMP AT+CSCB

Function Select Character Set Set Text Mode Parameters Select Cell Broadcast Message Type

Differences in GR64 compared with GR47/48 Same as GR47/GR48 command Same as GR47/GR48 command Same as GR47/GR48 command

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4

Mechanical Comparisons
The GR4x and GR64 products are shown as mechanical views below. Clearly, the mechanical mounting arrangements are the same. In this respect the mechanical form and fit are identical. The differences are equally obvious. The GR64 modem circuit is contained on one side of the PCB assembly, allowing for two variants; integrated SIM holder.

one with nothing on the reverse side, other than the RF connector; another with an

GR4x

GR64

Integrated SIM variant

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